Why do NJ Medical Providers Need the Patient to Sign an Assignment of Benefits?

Why do NJ Medical Providers Need the Patient to Sign an Assignment of Benefits?

Callagy Law: Medical Provider Attorneys

Our firm represents medical providers in a variety of contexts – Workers’ Compensation, Personal Injury Protection (PIP), and Commercial Insurance (Major Medical) – and obtaining an Assignment of Benefits is crucial in litigating these matters. An Assignment of Benefits is essential for a medical provider – whether the physician, facility, or ancillary service provider – to have a right to payment from the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator (TPA). A medical provider or the administrative staff for the medical provider may feel overwhelmed by the number of forms that patients have to fill out prior to treatment. For instance, there are HIPPA release forms, as required by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which authorizes the use or disclosure of protected health information, and intake forms requesting medical history, insurance coverage information, and general patient information. Requiring more paperwork from the patients may be viewed as an additional burden placed on the administrative staff, as well as a burden on the patient receiving the treatment. However, these documents, in addition to obtaining a signed Assignment of Benefits, are a vital in protecting the interests of the treating medical provider and the patient.

How Does An Assignment of Benefits Affect a Medical Provider?

By signing an Assignment of Benefits (AOB), a patient is authorizing the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator to make health insurance payments directly to the treating medical provider. Essentially, the patient is “assigning” his or her right to receive the payment for the medical benefits. While medical providers benefit tremendously from having payments made directly to them, instead of the patient, from the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator, a signed Assignment of Benefits will also medical providers appeal denials and underpayments from the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator. For example, a patient may seek treatment from a medical provider who is not in network with their health insurance plan. These medical providers may also be referred to as a non-participating provider, a non-network provider, or an out of network provider. Essentially, this designation means that there is no contract in place between the medical provider and the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator for agreed upon, negotiated rates for services rendered. Therefore, the out of network medical provider has an expectation that payments for the treatment rendered will be made at their actual, billed charges. By having a signed Assignment of Benefits form, a medical provider may submit the Assignment of Benefits with the claim and request that payment be made directly to the medical provider, instead of having checks go to the patient. This provides a convenience for both the medical provider and the patient. Additionally, if the out of network medical provider is paid less than the actual, billed charges, the medical provider will likely want to challenge the payment directly with the Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator. By having an Assignment of Benefits signed by the Patient, the out of network medical provider may rely on the Assignment of Benefits to appeal the denial or underpayment. While having a signed Assignment of Benefits does not guarantee an out of network medical provider will have standing to file a litigation matter to recover the underpaid reimbursement from the Insurance Carrier, the Assignment of Benefits could be sufficient under the terms of certain health plans. An attorney who is experienced in healthcare law and medical revenue recovery can review the terms of the health insurance plan and provide guidance to the medical provider as to what, if any, additional documentation may be required to pursue recovery in a litigation matter. Because the use of an Assignment of Benefits, containing the most effective language, is such an important element to a medical provider’s financial interest in collecting payment from an Insurance Carrier or Third-Party Administrator and, possibly, challenging improper payments, a medical provider may want to have an attorney experienced with medical revenue recovery review the Assignment of Benefits. For more information or to consult with an attorney, contact Callagy Law today. In your service, Tamara Kotsev, Esq. Attorney, Medical Revenue Recovery

Attorney Advertising. This information is provided for entertainment purposes only. Since each case is different and laws and regulations change constantly in the legal world, this should not be construed as legal advice. Please note that online activity, interaction and/or communication does not form an attorney-client relationship.

Your Lions Live Here

Are you a curious person that wants to learn about how to master life and any challenge that comes your way?
Explore Your Resource For Creating and Living a Life of Mastery